Clouds Cover the Netherlands Exactly

Some argue that the Dutch are obsessed with the weather, or that they at least like to discuss it. Well, let me throw in some little discussion of my own, then!

From September 2011 onwards I lived for about a year in London, a city known for a lot, but not for good weather. I guess I have been very lucky, since I liked the weather in London just fine. London weather is said to be “hugely unpredictable, oscillating between heavy rain and scorching sunshine within the space of minutes.”

Continue reading

Advertisements

Graduating from LSE and Visiting Bath

The past weeks I have not been able to publish any posts here, but for good reason. I have been travelling to London, Bath, Munich, Salzburg, back to Munich, and to Aalten (a small town on the border between the Netherlands and Germany), to celebrate graduating from LSE (London and Bath), and Christmas with my girlfriend’s family (Munich and Salzburg) and with my family (Aalten). This post will be about the trip to England. Continue reading

The True Winner of the London 2012 Summer Olympics

Last summer in London I experienced the 2012 Summer Olympics. Many were preoccupied with the ‘total medal count’, which counts the number of golden, silver, bronze, and total medals per country (pick that category in which your country is performing best). Of course, the total medal count is not a ‘fair competition’. Some countries have a larger population, which gives them a bigger pool of athletes to fish from. Other countries are richer, which gives them more resources to facilitate the searching and training of potential medal-winners. I wanted to put the achievements of countries into perspective, and more specifically, to be able to say things like “given its population size and wealth, [insert country of interest] performed well during London 2012” with a bit more confidence. As for my motivation: indeed, I come from a small country,  whereas my girlfriend comes from the U.S. – last summer I heard “The Star-Spangled Banner” way more often than “Het Wilhelmus“. Continue reading