Artificial Intelligence: Dawn of a New Age of Central Planning?

For centuries have academics and politicians debated the merits and demerits of central planning. Central planning (or economic planning, or planned economy) is a mechanism that directly allocate resources. A central authority decides how and where stuff is produced and consumed. It contrasts with its ideological counterpart, the market mechanism, in which resources are allocated indirectly by buyers and sellers who make decisions within regulated marketplaces. Continue reading

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Why the government should not be the Big Innovator

A few weeks ago I got published with an article I wrote about the role governments can and cannot play in stimulating innovation. I responded to a piece that Rutger Bregman posted for the De Correspondent about the biggest inventor and innovator in the world: the government. He claims that governments are responsible for all major technological breakthroughs in the past 100 years and that they are the ultimate venture capitalists. The government should take a stronger role as a technological innovator at the expense of the free market.

Dangerous nonsense. Continue reading

Lessons from Africa for the Eurozone

Economists agree that countries should only have a monetary union if there is also a fiscal, economic, and political union. If you have a single currency, governments cannot print money to cover their debts, nor can they devalue their currency to regain competitiveness. Arguably, the EMU and European Union are unions with economic, political, and even fiscal elements. They, however, miserably fail to offer the necessary mechanisms to compensate for not having monetary sovereignty. Continue reading

Why Greece must leave the Eurozone

Greece must leave the Eurozone. The only alternative would be to set a lethal precedent of using a public referendum as a strategic negotiation tool. It would blow up the Eurozone as it critically offends Spanish, Italian, German, and Latvian electorates. Leaving the Eurozone would finally put the power with the people, where it belongs, and enable the Greek people to decide what their story for the future will be. Continue reading

4 crazy immigration puzzles and dilemmas

The past, say, 16 months Sarah and I have been working on my emigration to the U.S. Hundreds if not thousands of euros were spent and a Brazilian rain forest had to be cut for all the forms we needed to fill out. Most of the process is just a seemingly unending string of tiresome and repetitive activities. It’s not difficult necessarily, it’s just a lot of work.

But at some points along the way you are caught unaware, and jumped by problems that cannot be solved that easily. My (current) top 4 in this post. Continue reading