British men are gay. Or naughty during their holidays. Or have non-human sexual partners. Or women are cheaters.

This is at least what the Daily Mail seems to want us to believe. Here, they say the following:

The biggest difference between  men and women lies in the number of sexual partners – with men having ten in  their lifetime, compared to an average of seven for women.

To put it into context, they mean that before meeting ‘the one’ men on average have 10 sexual partners and women 7. That sounds about right, doesn’t it? Yes?

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Why American and European soccer players won’t play chess together

Firstly, a brief note on my absence, since tomorrow it would have been 7 months since my last blog post. In April this year I started working as a strategy consultant at Deloitte. Life’s been slightly different than it was a student, sadly leaving practically no time for writing here.

A while ago Sarah and I were on a trip to the U.S. Somewhere along the trip we watched the soccer game of the U.S. versus Mexico. After the game goalkeeper Tim Howard and offensive midfielder Clint Dempsey were interviewed. Something caught my attention, but at first I didn’t really know what it was. Then it hit me: these guys actually know what they are talking about.

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The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997), the Hatari! (1963) of the 1990s

As a child I was crazy about dinosaurs. It turns out that much of that craziness is somehow related to Steven Spielberg. It all started with Littlefoot, a little Apatosaurus. He starred in an extensive series of cartoons. The most notable, scary, heartbreaking, and profitable one is the first, The Land Before Time, in which Littlefoot finds his way to the Green Valley through a lot of hardships, mostly caused by a cruel, big Tyrannosaurus. I remember watching it dozens of times, Littlefoot fighting with Herbie for my attention, and I am not shy to admit that I watched it once more quite recently.

t-rex

Two tyrannosaurs, both from the creative hands of Steven Spielberg. At the left, Sharptooth, from the Land Before Time, and at the right the pride of Jurassic Park, breaking out of its enclosure.

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Reunion in Knokke and Romance in Bruges

Yesterday we returned from Belgium, where Sarah and I enjoyed an absolutely delightful weekend. In Knokke we met up with former LSE students to have a nice reunion. We then travelled to nearby Bruges, which amazed us with its beautiful World Heritage Site class town centre. Sarah and I stayed one day longer in Bruges to enjoy a little more of its romance.

 

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Some Cheap and Less Cheap Books

In the upcoming days and weeks I will apply for a job at some of the major strategy consultants. To do so, I have to pass some case interviews. To ace them, you need practice – a lot of practice. I ordered one of the (self-proclaimed) case interview bibles: Case in Point, written by Marc P. Cosentino. I had to pay about 25 euro for it, and a signifcant amount of shipping costs.

Today I received it. This book is supposed to give me more confidence. But then, I looked at the cover (see picture below).

CaseInPoint

Left: the book. Right: a close up of an interesting part of the cover.

So, apparently, proofreading the cover was too much to ask. And I paid (way) over 25 euro for this book. Continue reading

Graduating from LSE and Visiting Bath

The past weeks I have not been able to publish any posts here, but for good reason. I have been travelling to London, Bath, Munich, Salzburg, back to Munich, and to Aalten (a small town on the border between the Netherlands and Germany), to celebrate graduating from LSE (London and Bath), and Christmas with my girlfriend’s family (Munich and Salzburg) and with my family (Aalten). This post will be about the trip to England. Continue reading

The True Winner of the London 2012 Summer Olympics

Last summer in London I experienced the 2012 Summer Olympics. Many were preoccupied with the ‘total medal count’, which counts the number of golden, silver, bronze, and total medals per country (pick that category in which your country is performing best). Of course, the total medal count is not a ‘fair competition’. Some countries have a larger population, which gives them a bigger pool of athletes to fish from. Other countries are richer, which gives them more resources to facilitate the searching and training of potential medal-winners. I wanted to put the achievements of countries into perspective, and more specifically, to be able to say things like “given its population size and wealth, [insert country of interest] performed well during London 2012” with a bit more confidence. As for my motivation: indeed, I come from a small country,  whereas my girlfriend comes from the U.S. – last summer I heard “The Star-Spangled Banner” way more often than “Het Wilhelmus“. Continue reading