Artificial Intelligence: Dawn of a New Age of Central Planning?

For centuries have academics and politicians debated the merits and demerits of central planning. Central planning (or economic planning, or planned economy) is a mechanism that directly allocate resources. A central authority decides how and where stuff is produced and consumed. It contrasts with its ideological counterpart, the market mechanism, in which resources are allocated indirectly by buyers and sellers who make decisions within regulated marketplaces. Continue reading

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Behind the Scenes at the National Cathedral

Today, I would be a tourist in my own backyard as I would take the ‘Behind the Scenes Tour’ at the National Cathedral of Washington, D.C. It is the sixth largest cathedral in the world and one of D.C.’s architectural highlights. What sets it apart from all other cathedrals is that it is so young. Its construction was finished only in 1990, a mere 25 years ago.

The National Cathedral of Washington, D.C.

The National Cathedral of Washington, D.C.

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Why the government should not be the Big Innovator

A few weeks ago I got published with an article I wrote about the role governments can and cannot play in stimulating innovation. I responded to a piece that Rutger Bregman posted for the De Correspondent about the biggest inventor and innovator in the world: the government. He claims that governments are responsible for all major technological breakthroughs in the past 100 years and that they are the ultimate venture capitalists. The government should take a stronger role as a technological innovator at the expense of the free market.

Dangerous nonsense. Continue reading

Why the U.S. men’s soccer team will challenge the world

A few weeks ago the Dutch soccer world was upset as one of its biggest talents announced that he would quit soccer. The 19-year-old indicated he would rather go to a university.

This example once again marks an important difference between European and American soccer academies. In the U.S. you can combine professional soccer with a college degree – you are even encouraged to do so. In Europe, you’ll have to choose. Continue reading